Monthly Archives August 2019

ShakeID tracks touch action in multiuser display

first_img(Phys.org) — How do you determine who is doing the touching with a multi-user touch display? Microsoft Research has published a paper that presents a technique for doing so. The researchers make their attempt by fusing Kinect, mobile device inertial sensing, and multi-touch interactive displays. The technique can associate multi-touch interactions to individual users and their accelerometer-equipped mobile devices. ShakeID is the technique; it associates a specific user’s touch contacts on an interactive display to a mobile device held by the user. The phone’s on-board sensors and touch screen sensing go to work to drive the association. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Company uses Kinect to create a touchscreen out of any surface (w/ Video) © 2012 Phys.Org Citation: ShakeID tracks touch action in multi-user display (2012, June 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-06-shakeid-tracks-action-multi-user.html System includes Kinect camera, multi-touch display and 2 accelerometer-equipped phones (one visible). More information: Research paper: research.microsoft.com/pubs/16 … 080/ShakeIDchi12.pdf The researchers say that the technique is special compared to other approaches that require bringing the phone in physical contact with the display. ShakeID differs as it only requires the user to hold the phone while touching the display, The approach involves a Kinect camera, multi-touch display and two accelerometer-equipped phones. Specifically, the experimenters used the Microsoft Kinect for Windows SDK to track the hands of multiple users, the Microsoft Surface 2.0 SDK for the multi-touch display and two Windows Phone smartphones.If two users touch a display simultaneously in different locations to grab content, ShakeID can associate each touch to a specific user and transfer the correct content to each user’s personal device. Capabilities like this may make shared interactive displays for walk-up use in conference rooms and office hallways more useful. The study says that other applications for interactive displays incorporate smaller devices such as mobile phones. The researchers showed that ShakeID cross-correlates acceleration data from smartphones that people carry together with hand acceleration captured through Kinect to perform user identification. ShakeID matches the motion sensed by the device to motion observed by a Microsoft Kinect camera pointed at the users standing in front of the touch display. To validate this approach, the researchers conducted a 14 person user study and showed accuracy rates of 92% and higher.The authors say, though, that an important limitation of the process involves the case where the hand holding the phone is stationary. The researchers acknowledge the limits—in realtime the phone users holding the phone may not remain stationary, especially with larger displays.The paper is titled, “Your Phone or Mine? Fusing Body, Touch and Device Sensing for Multi-User Device-Display Interaction.” Microsoft’s Kinect made other news recently in London, where St. Thomas Hospital is testing out Kinect’s gesture controls and voice commands with surgeons. The team interacts with a computer that shows a 3-D image of the part of the body being operated on. Using Kinect, there is less risk of contamination from touching computer peripherals during an operation. Standing straight, arms raised, the surgeon issues commands to a Kinect sensor beneath a monitor displaying a 3-D image of the patient’s damaged body part. As such, the surgeon can pan across, zoom in and out, rotate images, lock the image and make markers.last_img read more

Biologists take journalists to task for sensationalizing animal sexual behavior headlines

first_img © 2012 Phys.org (Phys.org) — Andrew Barron and Mark Brown of Macquarie University, Sydney and Royal Holloway University of London, respectively, have a bone to pick with those who resort to tabloid sensationalism when creating headlines and indeed entire articles when writing for science journals and magazines, as they attempt to describe the sexual behavior of animals. In their commentary piece published in the journal Nature, they say that the media too often resorts to ascribing human sexuality terms to animals especially regarding atypical sexual relationships which can in some cases have negative connotations. Citation: Biologists take journalists to task for sensationalizing animal sexual behavior headlines (2012, August 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-08-biologists-journalists-task-sensationalizing-animal.html The two appear to be most concerned about authors and/or editors that use human terms to describe homosexual relationships between animals, describing them as gay, lesbian or in some cases transgender, when such terms are not just inaccurate, but are in some cases outright wrong. To bolster their case, they include a chart that lists actual titles or phrases used in scientific study papers, and the various ways writers and editors have butchered the words to help increase magazine sales or increase traffic on web sites. One such example: “The Ram as a model for behavioral neuroendocrinology” became “Brokeback Mutton” or “Yep, They’re Gay.” While somewhat humorous, the changes create the illusion that the behaviors exhibited by the real life ram, are somehow the same as those of gay human beings, which is of course utter nonsense because with humans, human emotions are involved, while emotions in animals, if they even really do exist, are not understood at all. But that’s beside the point, the real issue here is journalistic integrity, or the lack of it.If a writer is writing for a science magazine or web site, it’s imperative that he or she build a relationship with readers based on some degree of trust. Visitors come to such sites to learn something. If an author or editor resorts to tabloid headlines that distort what has been observed, they are violating that trust because their intent is no longer to inform, but to raise revenue. On the other hand, if the general media resort to such chicanery, it is assumed the public will understand that they are trying to be cute with their writing, though neither seems to care if the actual science behind the article ever emerges, which, as the two commentators point out, can lead to negative perceptions of the human beings that are being used for comparison. Reporting that an animal is engaging in gay or lesbian behavior in a sensationalistic way, for example, quite often comes across as an example of an aberration, which implies that there is something wrong with them, which in turn, implies that there is something wrong with humans that engage in same-sex relationships.Barron and Brown conclude by suggesting that those in the media could be a little more careful in how they choose to represent animal sexual behavior. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: Nature Sexual orientation has ‘in between’ groups, study shows Explore further More information: Science journalism: Let’s talk about sex, Nature, 488, 151–152 (09 August 2012) doi:10.1038/488151aAbstractThe media loves to sensationalize research on animal sexual behaviour — so be careful what you say, warn Andrew B. Barron and Mark J. F. Brown.last_img read more

Researchers get better view of penguins with affixed cameras and accelerometers w

first_imgCredit: PNAS Prior to this effort, other scientists have attached tiny cameras to the backs of penguins and then studied the video to learn more about their underwater habits. Other researchers have also attached different types of sensors to penguins to try to understand what happens as an individual hunted. This new research combines both ideas to provide a unique and clear picture of how a penguin’s body moves as it swims and catches food. Citation: Researchers get better view of penguins with affixed cameras and accelerometers (w/ video) (2013, January 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-01-view-penguins-affixed-cameras-accelerometers.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Play Non-foraging shallow dives. Credit: PNAS Just two sources make up most of an Adelie’s diet – shrimplike creatures called krill and bald notothens, a type of fish. To catch them, the penguins must be both quick and agile. To find out just how they go about their foraging, the researchers affixed small cameras to the bodies of 11 of the penguins along with two accelerometers, one on the head and one on the back – they allow the researchers to record the different ways the penguin moves. In so doing they were able to gather 85 minutes of data for each penguin. Afterwards, in studying the video and comparing it with data from the accelerometers, the researchers were able to gain a very clear understanding of how the penguins caught their prey. Explore further PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen © 2013 Phys.orgcenter_img More information: “Linking animal-borne video to accelerometers reveals prey capture variability,” by Yuuki Y. PNAS, 2013. www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1216244110 PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Play Antarctic silver fish (Pleuragramma antarcticum) capture in a school. Credit: PNAS (Phys.org)—Japanese researchers have taken the science of studying an animal in its natural environment a step further by attaching a camera and accelerometers to Adelie penguins as they forage for food off the waters of Antarctica. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers describe how they were able to watch the intimate details of the foraging habits of the penguins in ways never before seen. Play Sub-ice fish (Pagothenia borchgrevinki) capture. Credit: PNAS In their study, the researchers learned that the penguins catch fish close to the surface, but must dive deeper to catch krill and that fish provide a more steady diet than krill. They also learned that the penguins move beneath their prey, preferring to catch it while moving upwards and in the case of krill, also turning their heads very quickly at the last second as a means of striking. In watching the penguins in action, the team also learned that the penguins are remarkably efficient foragers – none of them ever once returned to the surface without having caught the prey they were after. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Emperor penguins use sea ice to rest between long foraging periodslast_img read more

German student builds electromagnetic harvester to recharge a battery

first_imgCredit: Dennis Siegel Dennis Siegel, a student at the University of the Arts in Bremen, Germany has built what he calls an electromagnetic harvester—it converts electromagnetic fields in the immediate environment into electricity to recharge a common AA battery. He’s won a 2nd place award in the HfK Bremen Hochschulpreis 2013 competition for Digitale Medien, for his efforts. Citation: German student builds electromagnetic harvester to recharge a battery (2013, February 12) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-02-german-student-electromagnetic-harvester-recharge.html Credit: Dennis Siegel The particulars of the electronics inside his device haven’t been detailed (likely to prevent copycats) with a description only of “coils and high frequency diodes” being put to use to allow for the conversion. But that clearly isn’t the point of his device. Instead, it highlights not only the fact that we live our lives in a constant state of bombardment of electromagnetism, but also that all of the energy from all of the collective devices in use in the world today, is currently going to waste. But, because of small devices like the one Siegel has built, it becomes possible to envision banks of such devices sitting on roofs (or other places) making use of that electromagnetism to add to the electricity generated by other renewable sources, such as solar or wind collection devices—just another way to demonstrate a higher level of intelligent power generation and conservation. © 2013 Phys.orgcenter_img Explore further Electromagnetism is all around us of course. In addition to natural sources, such as lightning, it’s also given off by virtually every electronic gadget, device or machine humans make. Siegel (and many others) have noted that the electromagnetism around us all could be converted to electricity and used for some purpose. The problem of course, is that the comparatively small amount of it in the air around us isn’t enough to make much electricity—the device Siegel built takes up to a day to charge a single AA battery. But that’s not reason enough to not build and use a device, as he has demonstrated. He’s added electronics to give the device the capability of capturing electromagnetism in two ranges—one below 100Hz (electrical mains, etc.) and another for capturing those above 100Hz (Blue tooth frequencies etc.). On top is a red LED to indicate how strong the electromagnetism is in the area and on the back is a magnet for affixing the device to a metal surface near a good source. RCA’s Airenergy charger converts WiFi energy to electricity This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Physicists test aerodynamics of soccer ball types prior to World Cup w

first_img How will the 2014 World Cup ball swerve? (Phys.org) —A pair of physicists with Japan’s University of Tsukuba has tested the aerodynamics of several types of soccer balls to determine which fly the most true when kicked. Sungchan Hong and Takeshi Asai report their findings in a paper they’ve had published in Scientific Reports. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Citation: Physicists test aerodynamics of soccer ball types prior to World Cup (w/ Video) (2014, June 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-06-physicists-aerodynamics-soccer-ball-prior.html More information: Effect of panel shape of soccer ball on its flight characteristics, Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 5068 DOI: 10.1038/srep05068AbstractSoccer balls are typically constructed from 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. Recently, however, newer balls named Cafusa, Teamgeist 2, and Jabulani were respectively produced from 32, 14, and 8 panels with shapes and designs dramatically different from those of conventional balls. The newest type of ball, named Brazuca, was produced from six panels and will be used in the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil. There have, however, been few studies on the aerodynamic properties of balls constructed from different numbers and shapes of panels. Hence, we used wind tunnel tests and a kick-robot to examine the relationship between the panel shape and orientation of modern soccer balls and their aerodynamic and flight characteristics. We observed a correlation between the wind tunnel test results and the actual ball trajectories, and also clarified how the panel characteristics affected the flight of the ball, which enabled prediction of the trajectory. Explore further Multi-purpose Kick Robot. Credit: Sungchan Hong, University of Tsukuba, JAPAN Effect of panel shape of soccer ball on its flight characteristics. (a, b) Adidas Brazuca: small dimple and six panels, (c, d) Adidas Cafusa: small grip texture and 32 modified panels, (e, f) Adidas Jabulani: small ridges or protrusions and eight panels, (g, h) Adidas Teamgeist 2: small protuberances and 14 panels; (i, j) Molten Vantaggio (conventional soccer ball): smooth surface and 32 pentagonal and hexagonal panels. (Photo by S.H.). Credit: Scientific Reports 4, Article number: 5068 doi:10.1038/srep05068 For most of modern history, soccer balls didn’t inspire much conversation prior to, and during World Cup competition, they were all made in the familiar 32 (hand-stitched) panel format. That all changed in 2006, however, when Adidas (official ball supplier) decided to make some changes. First came the Teamgeist, a ball with just 14 panels. The 8-panel Jabulani ball followed in 2010. This time around, Adidas has created a ball called the Brazuca—it has just 6 panels. But the real question is, does it matter?It clearly matters to players—they criticized the Jabulani, claiming it was erratic, tending to break in odd ways during play. While it’s likely that losing teams were more likely to complain about the ball type being used, few believe it played much of a role in who won or lost a match, since both teams used the same ball. Still, most would also probably agree that it would be nice to know which types of balls work better than others. To find out Hong and Asai collected samples of all of the new types of balls introduced by Adidas, along with some of the original design and tested them all using robots kicking balls in a wind tunnel.In analyzing the results, the research duo corroborated the claims made by players in 2010—the Jabulani performed the worst of all those tested. The newest incarnation, the Brazuca performed best, remaining most true when kicked, followed by the old 32 panel standard. The Teamgeist was only slightly better than the Jabulani. © 2014 Phys.org Journal information: Scientific Reports Play The sample of the trajectory on the Brazuca using the kick robot. Credit: Sungchan Hong, University of Tsukuba. The outcome should not be surprising, Adidas put a lot of research into creating the new ball design this time around. In addition to gluing the panels on, they also added nearly imperceptible nubs that reduce what are known in the game as knuckling effects. Also, the seams are three times deeper than other balls as well, which means less drag. Once the company had a finished product, they put it to the test—over the course of three years the ball was used by more than 600 players in practice. Hopefully that will translate to good play this World Cup, with conversation focused on players and teams, rather than the balls they are kicking.last_img read more

Male Manogea porracea spiders found to care for young

first_img © 2016 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A trio of Brazilian researchers has found that a species of spider, Manogea porracea, is unique in that the male plays a major role in web upkeep and protection of their young. In their paper published in the journal Animal Behavior, Rafael Rios Mouraa, João Vasconcellos-Netob and Marcelo de Oliveira Gonzagac, describe their study of the spider that lives throughout Central and South America. Explore further Citation: Male Manogea porracea spiders found to care for young (2016, December 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-12-male-manogea-porracea-spiders-young.html Journal information: Animal Behavior Male spiders are not known for caring for their young. Instead, many species are notorious because the females eat the males; males of other spider species simply die after mating. But until now, just one species of male spider has ever been seen providing assistance to its young—the social male African Stegodyphus domicols have been observed guarding offspring. But M. porracea takes paternal care to a whole new level, the researchers report. After mating, when the females produce egg sacs, the males build a dome-shaped web over the top of the web where the mother and egg sacs reside. That allows the male to capture prey while also offering support to his offspring. The researchers report that in addition to attacking predators, the males have been spotted making repairs to the web and even mopping up rain drops from the egg sacs, presumably to allow air to get inside.To learn more about the unique species, the researchers set up camp in a eucalyptus plantation (the spiders live on the lower limbs and within leaves that fall) and then watched what happened as the spiders mated and produced offspring. They report that by the end of the mating season, 68 percent of the egg sacs were being tended to by single adult male spiders—the mothers had died, mostly from being eaten by predators. If a female died, the male simply moved to the web holding the egg sacs. The males continued their parenting duties after the young emerged from the egg sacs. The researchers also captured some of the spiders and watched what happened when they were placed in the vicinity of predators—they found the males would attack them. In situations where both parents were killed, the researchers found that half of the webs collapsed due to neglect, making it impossible for the young to survive.The researchers suggest that the high female mortality rate is due to the females offering a fattier meal for predators—they fatten up after mating in preparation for reproducing. For the species to survive, the male had to take on more responsibility. Dew on a spider’s web in the morning. Credit: Wikipedia/Luc Viatour/Lucnix.be , Animal Behaviour More information: Rafael Rios Moura et al, Extended male care in Manogea porracea (Araneae: Araneidae): the exceptional case of a spider with amphisexual care, Animal Behaviour (2017). DOI: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2016.09.018 Male orb-weaving spiders cannibalized by females may be choosy about matinglast_img read more

Astronomers discover a companion of the nearby star HD 118475

first_img Millisecond pulsar PSR J0740+6620 has a white dwarf companion with helium atmosphere, study suggests Citation: Astronomers discover a companion of the nearby star HD 118475 (2019, March 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-03-astronomers-companion-nearby-star-hd.html Located approximately 107 light years away from the Earth, HD 118475 is around 12 percent more massive than our sun, has an effective temperature of nearly 5,900 K, and a metallicity at a level of about 0.07.A team of astronomers led by Stephen R. Kane of the University of California, Riverside, has conducted radial velocity observations of HD 118475 looking for any objects, mainly planets, accompanying this star as part of the Anglo-Australian Planet Search (AAPS). For this purpose, they employed the UCLES high-resolution spectrograph on the 3.9m Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) located in Australia.The over decade-long observational campaign of HD 118475 resulted in finding evidence of a compact companion to this star. The discovery was confirmed by follow-up direct imaging observations with the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument (DSSI) instrument on Gemini-South telescope in Hawaii.”Radial velocity (RV) searches for exoplanets have surveyed many of the nearest and brightest stars for long-term velocity variations indicative of a companion body. (…) Here, we present the discovery of a compact companion to the nearby star HD 118475,” the astronomers wrote in the paper.The observations found an object moving on a 2,070-day orbit, at a distance of some 3.69 AU from HD 118475. The researchers calculated that the minimum mass of the newfound companion is about 0.44 solar masses and the system is approximately 4.1 billion years old.According to the study, the researchers initially supposed that the companion is most likely a previously undetected main sequence star. However, data from DSSI ruled out this possibly and provided evidence suggesting that this object is most likely a white dwarf. “The source of the periodic RV signal observed for HD 118475 must therefore be a compact object, most likely a white dwarf based on the range of possible orbital inclinations,” the paper reads.Given that many parameters of the system remain unknown, more observations are required in order to unveil the true nature of the companion. For instance, future data releases from ESA’s Gaia satellite have the potential to reveal the companion’s exact mass. Moreover, further direct imaging observations with greater sensitivity could be also helpful to confirm the white dwarf nature of the newly found object.”In the future, the release of data obtained by the Gaia mission will allow the orbital inclination of the system to be determined with exquisite precision which, in combination with the existing RV data, will produce a measurement of the companion’s true mass,” the researchers concluded. Explore further AAT RV data for HD 118475, shown as yellow points, and the best-fit model, shown as a blue solid curve. The unphased data with residuals are shown in the top panel, and the phased data are shown in the bottom panel. Image credit: Kane et al., 2019. More information: Stephen R. Kane et al. Discovery of a Compact Companion to a Nearby Star. arXiv:1903.04529 [astro-ph.SR]. arxiv.org/abs/1903.04529 © 2019 Science X Network This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Using radial velocity method and direct imaging, astronomers have found a compact companion of a nearby star known as HD 118475. The finding is detailed in a paper published March 11 on the arXiv pre-print server, in which the authors reveal fundamental parameters of the system and discuss the nature of the newly found companion.last_img read more

Indian sand artiste wins Danish grand prize

first_imgIndian sand artiste Sudarsan Pattnaik has won the Danish ‘Grand Prize’ at the 2nd Copenhagen International Sand Sculpture Festival 2013 for his 15-foot coloured sand sculpture created on the ‘Go green, Save Earth’ theme. Pattnaik got the award Monday at the prestigious festival being held in Denmark’s capital city for his maiden coloured sand sculpture on foreign land. It took him seven days to complete the art work. After winning the prize, the Odisha-based artist said from Copenhagen that he had chosen environment as a theme as global warming affects the whole world. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Pattnaik, 36, who has been doing sand sculptures for 25 years, said he had always felt that people needed to ponder over ‘their treatment with the environment’.  They should ‘find a proper way to have a balance with the nature’. Innovative art had always been a passion and the sand provided ready inspiration. ‘As my house is very close to the Puri sea beach in Odisha, I chose the beach as my canvas.’ Pattnaik, who has recently won the Moscow Choice prize in Russia and jury prize last year in Copenhagen besides other international accolades, finds sand art to be a ‘unique medium’ for awareness. There were 17 participant countries in the Copenhagen competition. While Ghana won the Jury prize, Italy won the Artist prize.The festival is open for visitors up to 25 August.last_img read more

History unbound

first_imgHistorians and researchers should help the government in its efforts to publicise the country’s antiquities through the cyber world, even as the government wants artefacts to returned to their sites to add to their contextual significance. These were the views of Culture Secretary Ravindra Singh said when he inaugurated the 23rd Indian Art History Congress (IAHC) at the National Museum (NM) in the capital, on 11 November. The IANH will focus on facilitating scholarly exchange about India’s diverse artistic forms from ancient to modern times. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’‘The ASI (Archaelogical Survey of India) has published more than 3 lakh antiquities online, while 10,000 objects being exhibited by 10 museums in the country have also gone online. Their public value can rise by leaps and bounds if we got more human resource to pad them up with background material,’ he said at the opening of the three-day IAHC being attended by 200 delegates and slated to present 93 research papers around the core theme: ‘Cross-Cultural Assimilation and Composite Forms in Indian Art’. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe top bureaucrat also stressed the need for focused research on the ‘Indian Ocean as a cultural landscape’, noting that the Ministry had  launched Project Mausam that will explore the impact of cross civilisational contacts in art, culture and trade on the maritime routes.NM Director-General Dr Venu Vasudevan released a document featuring the proceedings of the 23rd IAHC.  Leading historian Prof M K Dhavalikar gave a power-point presentation on the cave temples in Mumbai. Titled ‘Treasure Island’, throwing light on the value of the caves as massive repositories of Buddhist art and aesthetics that are stylistically similar to the paintings and sculptures in Ajanta and Ellora caves.last_img read more

Simply Dilli

first_imgSince times immemorial, the Haat has been a flourishing and sought after destination for major crafts, handloom and handicraft exhibitions in the country. Dilli Haat INA is a one stop preface to the heart of India, a window to country’s vast cultural diversity. Artisans view Dilli Haat INA as a clean, systematic and open platform to present their creations. Also, the popularity of the Haat makes external marketing of products needless over displaying them here. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Nearly 150 artisans from all over the nation get the opportunity to showcase their creations at the premises every fortnight. In a bid to strengthen the tourism circuit of Delhi, these creators directly connect with the buyers and stakeholders, in turn significantly impacting entrepreneurship trends of the country.Dilli Haat INA recently was the venue for ongoing 29th edition of Dastkari Haat Crafts Bazaar (1st – 15th January). The festival showcased intricate craftsmanship and talent of Tibetan award winning artisans along with other craftsmen from different states of the country. Some of the artisans in this festival had carried forward the age old tradition of making handicrafts and handlooms. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixPaper mache works from Kashmir to the rare Blue pottery of Delhi and even terracotta vessels sizing a finger were some of the attractions presented at this Bazaar. The exhibition also highlighted the cultural identity of Dilli Haat INA, by having put together some specialized cultural performances by Tibetan dancers and melodious music by traditional Ramdev folk singers from Kutch in the evening.Dilli Haat INA has always been a clean and hygienic place and Swachh Bharat Abhiyan activities are thoroughly being executed at the venue. “14 housekeeping persons, 137 dustbins and officers of Delhi Tourism ensure that the place doesn’t fall short of sanitation and amenities in any manner. I have inspected Dilli Haat INA and the designated officers of Delhi Tourism have been ensuring cleanliness and hygiene throughout the venue. Standardized food stalls, cultural evenings along with other facilities make the venue systematic and compact with its true essence intact,” says Ramesh Tiwari, MD & CEO, DTTDC. A footfall of around 3000 visitors a day, rising to nearly 5000 on weekends, Dilli Haat INA is a contained and calm hangout nestled amidst the hustle and bustle of city life. Dilli Haat INA remains as one of the most secured places for visitors. 25 food stalls leave no stone unturned in serving the diverse food of a vast nation. Come and experience diversity in its true sense, Dilli Haat INA welcomes all.last_img read more