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Monarch Beverage to Distribute Easley Wines

first_imgAdvertisementEasley Winery selects family-owned Monarch Beverage as Indiana distributorINDIANAPOLIS – Easley Winery, a family-owned winery located in downtown Indianapolis, announced today that Monarch Beverage will bring the Easley Winery brands, Reggae, No Opposition, Sweet Tulip, Jubilee, Kauffman and Easley, to more Hoosier communities. Easley wines are currently distributed in seven other states.“The Easley Family has enjoyed the privilege of making wine in downtown Indianapolis since 1974,” says winery spokesperson Meredith Easley.  “And, we’ve experienced tremendous growth. Of the 8,463 wineries in the US, we are now in the top 3% in size. Recently, the wine industry has seen consolidation at the distributor and retailer level and even at the winery level. This new climate makes it more competitive to get Easley wine brands that Hoosiers are requesting into their communities.  We are aligning with Monarch Beverage as they have proven to provide great service to their customers and reach every community in Indiana. With their help we are excited to connect with our current fans and meet new ones.”John Xenos of Monarch Beverage adds, “We’re extremely excited to win the Easley family’s confidence.  They have been a leader in the wine industry with their brand development and community support through promotional activity and contributions.  Their community commitment aligns with Monarch Beverage people and business principles.”About Easley WineryIn the 1970’s local attorney, Jack Easley and his wife Joan saw an opportunity to breathe viticulture into their hometown.  They bought an ice cream factory and turned it into a winery. Now, 43 years later, that original site has expanded into multiple buildings creating a campus that houses a full production grape to glass winery in the heart of downtown Indy.  Over 136,000 gallons of wine have been produced at this location since January of this year. About Monarch Beverage Monarch Beverage, founded in 1947, is Indiana’s largest distributor of wine and beer. Each day, Monarch trucks transport some 64,000 cases of beer and wine from the Indianapolis distribution center to more than 7,000 Hoosier retail accounts. Guiding these activities is a singular mission statement and set of principles created by employees.Advertisement Email Linkedin Share Twitter Previous articleGet a Broom! Global Spirits Brands Sweep Up the Gold at the LA International Spirits CompetitionNext articleAfternoon Brief, June 16 Press Release ReddIt Home Industry News Releases Monarch Beverage to Distribute Easley WinesIndustry News ReleasesWine BusinessMonarch Beverage to Distribute Easley WinesBy Press Release – June 16, 2017 76 0 TAGSEasley WineryMonarch Beverage Facebook Pinterestlast_img read more

New Challenge

first_imgWhen Dustin Johnson returns to the PGA Tour in two weeks at the Farmers Insurance Open it will have been six months since last he plied his trade at the highest level, but for the 30-year-old it may as well have been a lifetime ago. When the eight-time Tour winner finished up his season at the Canadian Open he was, by his own admission, not happy. He was tired of underachieving – again, by his own admission – and needed to reset. Since then he’s surrounded himself with an assortment of professionals and even a “life coach,” to learn how to deal with stress and the realities of a vastly changing world, none bigger than the birth of Johnson and fiancé Paulina Gretzky’s first child, son Tatum, on Monday. “He’s awesome. Couldn’t be better. It’s been really, really cool,” Johnson told GolfChannel.com Friday in a one-one-one phone interview. But then fatherhood doesn’t seem to fully describe the transformation Johnson said he has made in the last six months. When he bolted the Tour last July “to seek professional help for personal challenges,” few could have predicted how hectic the next few months would be. Two days after announcing his leave of absence, Golf.com, citing an unnamed source, reported that Johnson had actually been suspended by the Tour for failing his third drug test. Both the Tour and Johnson denied that report. “No. I’ve already answered all these questions,” Johnson said on Friday when asked about a prior Golf.com report. He did concede, however, that there were plenty of challenges he needed to face before becoming a father or returning to professional golf. Although he said he didn’t go to a rehabilitation clinic, he did surround himself with people who could teach him how to deal with life’s unpredictability. “I had to take a look at my goals,” he said. “Finding out Paulina was pregnant I knew it was time to do some soul searching and really work on me. I want to be a great father and a great husband.” One of those people who stepped in to help was Paulina’s father, hockey legend Wayne Gretzky. Johnson sold his South Florida home, although he has purchased a new home just down the street that he plans to move into once it’s renovated, and spent much of the last six months living in a rented house near Gretzky at Sherwood Country Club outside Los Angeles. “He’s been great,” Johnson said. “Honestly, you can’t ask for a better role model as far as sports are concerned. The things he’s done in his career no one will ever do. Just having someone like that to talk to. We played golf every day. We see them every day, we have breakfast up there and dinner with them.” Gretzky taught Johnson how to engage fans and deal with the pressures that come with a high-profile marriage. But mostly Gretzky just listened to a man who has never seemed entirely comfortable in the spotlight and often resorted to self-destructive outlets to deal with his pressures. “One big thing that I learned was stress. The way I describe it is the way I am on the golf course I act like I don’t get too excited or too down on myself. I kind of transferred that over to life,” Johnson said. “I always kept things inside. I never dealt with them. When I was drinking, I’d drink too much. Dealing with all that helped a bunch.” Johnson recently worked with his swing coach, Butch Harmon, who said he’s impressed with the new and improved player, both physically and mentally. “He seems to have his head on straight and is in great shape,” Harmon said. A large part of Johnson’s transformation was prompted by the impending birth of his son, but there was also an underlying desire to turn what he says has been a good career into a great one. Reaching his full potential crystalized in September while he watched the U.S. team – a team he qualified for but didn’t play on following his announced hiatus – at the Ryder Cup. “The only thing I regret is not playing in the Ryder Cup,” he said. “Everything I have done has been to help me and help my family. Right now I couldn’t be in a better place, and I’m focused on playing as well as I can.” It will be a 146-mile drive from Los Angeles to Torrey Pines for Johnson’s first start of the year, but that doesn’t come close to the metaphorical distance he seems to have traveled in his return to the Tour.last_img read more

See Dee Dee Bridgewater Glam It Up as Billie Holiday in Lady Day Off-Broadway

first_img View Comments Tony winner Dee Dee Bridgewater will channel iconic jazz singer Billie Holiday in the off-Broadway bio play-with-music Lady Day, and you can get your first look at the superstar performance in this fabulous Hot Shot. Bridgewater is joined by David Ayers, Rafael Poueriet and a quartet of veteran musicians as they honor the late singer and tell the inspired story of Holiday’s final comeback performance. The show features selections from Holiday’s catalogue of hit songs, including “God Bless the Child,” “Strange Fruit” and “My Man.” Check out the glamorous photo above, and make your way to the Little Shubert Theatre to catch this intimate show (written and directed by Stephen Stahl) when it begins performances September 19!last_img

Care for the elderly

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

SA unearths new human ancestor

first_imgThe skull and skeletal fragments of the juvenile male fossil Australopithecus sediba, a newly discovered species of hominid. Human evolutionary tree showing the position of Australopithecus sediba, by Peter Schmid of the University of Zurich. (Click on image to enlarge.) MEDIA CONTACTS • Professor Lee Berger +27 11 717 6604 +27 71 864 0860 [email protected] / [email protected] • Professor Paul Dirks +61 74781 5047 + 61 429 566120 [email protected] • Institute for Human Evolution + 27 11 717 6695 [email protected] RELATED ARTICLES • African human genomes decoded• SA unearths 18 new species• World Heritage in South AfricaLucille DavieAs I stare at the skeleton of this human ancestor in its glass case I find the idea difficult to grasp: this boy walked this very area of the earth almost 2-million years ago.An entirely new species of hominid, or ape-man, has been described following the discovery of two 1.9-million-year-old fossilised skeletons in the Cradle of Humankind near Johannesburg.• View and download high-resolution images of the discoveryNamed Australopithecus sediba, the creatures had long ape-like arms and short powerful hands, so they probably retained their ability to climb trees. But they also had a more advanced pelvis and long legs that would have allowed them to stride and possibly run like modern humans.The skeletons, of a boy between 11 and 13 years and an adult female in her late 20s or early 30s, were unearthed by a team from the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), led by professors Lee Berger and Paul Dirks. Berger is a palaeoanthropologist at Wits and Dirks a geologist based at the James Cooke University in Australia.Fragments of the boy’s skeleton were on display at the announcement of the find on 8 April at Maropeng, the visitors’ centre of the  Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site.Berger believes Australopithecus sediba is likely to be the transitional species between the southern African ape-man Australopithecus africanus, such as the Taung Child and Mrs Ples, and either Homo habilis or even a direct ancestor of Homo erectus – Turkana Boy, Java man and Peking man.The australopithecines are believed to be the ancestors of species in the genus Homo, which includes modern humans. The find, which Berger describes as the Rosetta Stone of human evolution, promises to turn the palaeontological world upside down. Homo habilis will have to be re-examined, and textbooks rewritten.“It is estimated that they were both about 1.27 metres, although the child would certainly have grown taller,” Berger said. “The female probably weighed about 33 kilograms and the child about 27 kilograms at the time of his death.“The brain size of the juvenile was between 420 and 450 cubic centimetres, which is small when compared to the human brain of about 1 200 to 1 600 cubic centimetres, but the shape of the brain seems to be more advanced than that of [other] australopithecines.”Australopithecus sediba‘s environment would have been a mix of open savannah grassland and forest.The fossils were deposited in a single debris flow and were found together in the remains of a deeply eroded cave system. It’s likely that they died at about the same time, and could have known each other, or even been related.Berger, whose 11-year-old son Matthew found the first fossil, expects many more fossils to be excavated from the site. With 130 bone fragments recovered, they are the most complete hominid skeletons ever found. And Berger is confident that the site will yield the missing pieces.Sediba is Sesotho for spring, fountain or wellspring, and the species so named because it is hoped that “a great source of information will spring from the fossils”.The find is the cover story of the prestigious journal Science, with two articles, written by Berger and Dirks, published on 9 April 2010.“I am having the adventure of my life,” Berger said.International team of scientistsBerger and Dirks have assembled a team of around a dozen international scientists to work on the find. In total, some 60 scientists from around the world have been involved in unravelling the discovery.The first step was a geological study, to help determine the age of the fossils. Other dating techniques included assessing the uranium lead components in the rock, establishing its magnetic polarity, which changes over time, and studying the site’s rate of erosion.Dirks studied the context of how the fossils landed in the cave, taking a series of sedimentary deposits and making a detailed description of different rocks up to two metres deep.“It is a hole in the ground – it must have been a cave,” he said.Investigation revealed that the fossils were deposited by a muddy flow of water, which probably carried the two bodies at the same time, because they were found together. Other fossils found were a 1.5-million-year-old sabre tooth cat, and 2.36-million-year-old wild cats and dogs.The erosion rate of the opening was measured, and it was established that it had been between 30 and 50 metres deep.“The animals probably smelled the water in the cave, and fell into the cave trying to get to it,” said Dirks. They would have died almost immediately, and their bodies carried down into a deeper chamber of the cave, joining others that suffered the same fate. This is supported by the fact that the fossils have no scavenger or insect damage.Excavations have not yet begun, says Dirks, only the surface has been cleared.Using Google Earth to find fossilsThis adventure began some 18 months ago, in early 2008, Berger said. He first charted the area on Google Earth, finding 600 new sites in the Cradle of Humankind, and then walked it with his dog, Tau.On the day the first fossil was found he and Matthew, then nine, were walking with post-doctoral student Job Kibbii and Tau. They walked to the edge of a pit, and Berger encouraged the others to look around.“Within one and a half minutes Matthew called out that he had found something,” said Berger. At first he thought it was a fragment of antelope, a common find. Then he recognised the fossil as the collar bone of a hominid.He soon found other fragments – a scapula or shoulder blade, normally never found because it is so fragile and erodes quickly – and arm bones, while two hominid teeth “fell into my hands”.Matthew said he has been on sites with his father more than 20 times, and intends to become a palaeoanthropologist too.Treasure chestProfessor emeritus Philip Tobias, present at the announcement, described the area as a “treasure chest”“I am thrilled that our expectations of the cradle area have so soon been realised,” he said. “This evidence a kilometre or two from Sterkfontein has yielded several hominid individuals and that is something to get very excited about.”Describing the find as “ä great joy”, Tobias said that the fact that two skeletons had been found means that it allows scientists to study a family or community which is much more valuable than studying individual fossils.Children in South Africa have been invited to come up with a name for the skeleton of the boy.The fossil will be on display at Maropeng until 18 April, and will then move to Cape Town for the launch of Palaeo-Sciences Week from 19 April. It will again be on display at the Origins Centre at Wits during May.last_img read more